LATIN EXTRACTS IN EARLY MODERN MANUSCRIPTS

The Latin text is from the Latin sources not from the manuscripts themselves.

SP State Papers

Alcuinus

Epistolae 100, 0233D: Amici tibi sint multi, consiliarius autem unus (Eccli. VI, 6: Multi pacifici sint tibi, et consiliarius sit tibi unus de mille)

Christopher Rous, Commonplace book 1623-4, Folger L.b.674, fol. 3r, attributed to Cicero (Actione in Verre tertia, Gilbert Cavendish, A discourse against flatterie (1628), STC 6906, 28, note 12)

John Chrysostom

Homilia in Matthaeum, 46, 23.7: justicia … non est misericordia, sed fatuitas

Sloane MS 2215, fol. 3, commonplace book concerning select wisdoms from various authors, (1594-   )

Cicero  

            Academica

Cic. Ac. Pos. 3: digladiari autem semper, depugnare in facinorosis et audacibus quis non cum miserrimum turn etiam stultissimum dixerit? (But to be always crossing swords and fighting to the end among criminals and desperadoes—who would not call this a most pitiable and also a most foolish occupation? (H. Rackham))

The Second. That the bands of footmen are at this present rather an offence than a defence to the province of Munster. SP 63/135 f.152v, 1588

            Epistulae ad Familiares

Cic. Fam. 1.7.5: ex eventu homines de tuo consilio existimaturos videremus; si cecidisset ut volumus et optamus, omnis te et sapienter et fortiter, si aliquid esset offensum, eosdem illos et cupide et temere fecisse dicturos. qua re, quid adsequi possis, non tam facile est nobis quam tibi, cuius prope in conspectu Aegyptus est, iudicare (men are likely to judge of your pokey according to its issue, that if it should fall out as we hope and pray it will, everybody wall say you acted with wisdom and courage ; if there be any hitch, the same people will say you acted with greed and rashness. And so it is not so easy foi us to judge how far you may succeed, as it is for you, who have Egypt almost before your eyes (trans. W. Glynn Williams))

Throckmorton to Cecil. SP 70/26 f.79v,  May 16 1561

Cic. Fam. 10.25.3: omnia te metiri dignitate malim quam ambitione maioremque (judge of everything by consideration for your true position (trans. W. Glynn Williams))

Christopher Rous, Commonplace book 1623-4, Folger L.b.674, fol. 2v, attributed to Pliny 

            De Officiis

Cic. Off. 1.63: scientia, quae est remota ab iustitia, calliditas potius quam sapientia est appellanda (knowledge that is divorced from justice [is] called cunning rather than wisdom(trans. W. Glynn Williams))

Christopher Rous, Commonplace book 1623-4, Folger L.b.674, fol. 2v, attributed to Plato 

Cic. Off. 1.83: in tranquillo tempestatem adversam optare dementis est, subvenire autem tempestati quavis ratione sapientis (only a madman … in a calm, would pray for a storm; a wise man’s way is, when the storm does come, to withstand it (trans. Walter Miller))

Nicholas Webster, fl. 1650, Certain profitable and well experienced collections for making conserve of fruits . . . as also of surgery, approved medicines, Folger V.a.364, front endleaf 5 recto

Cic. Off. 1.87: sine acerbitate dissensio (there was in it no trace of rancour (trans. Walter Miller))

Sir John Davys to Sir Ralph Wynwood. SP 63/232 f.212, Oct. 31 1614  

Cic. Off. 2.43: ficta omnia celeriter tamquam flosculi decidunt, nee simulatum potest quicquam esse diuturnum (all pretences soon fall to the ground like fragile flowers, and nothing counterfeit can be lasting (trans. Walter Miller))

Nicholas Webster, fl. 1650, Certain profitable and well experienced collections for making conserve of fruits . . . as also of surgery, approved medicines, Folger V.a.364, front endleaf 5 recto

Cic. Off. 2.71: fundamentum enim est perpetuae commendationis et famae iustitia, sine qua nihil potest esse laudabile. (For the foundation of enduring reputation and fame is justice, and without justice there can be nothing worthy of praise. (trans. Walter Miller))

Nicholas Webster, fl. 1650, Certain profitable and well experienced collections for making conserve of fruits . . . as also of surgery, approved medicines, Folger V.a.364, front endleaf 5 recto     

            De Oratore

Cic. De Orat. 2.36: Historia vero testis temporum, lux veritatis, vita memoriae, magistra vitae nuntia vetustatis 

Christopher Rous, Commonplace book 1623-4, Folger L.b.674, fol. 3r 

            In Pisonem

Cic. Pis. 24. 57: fructus verae virtutis honestissimus (the most honourable reward of genuine virtue (trans. C.D. Younge))

Christopher Rous, Commonplace book 1623-4, Folger L.b.674, fol. 2v 

            De Republica

Cic. Rep. 5.8: Ut enim gubernatori cursus secundus, medico salus, imperatori victoria, sic huic moderatori rei publicae beata civium vita proposita est, ut opibus firma, copiis locuples, gloria ampla, virtute honesta sit; huius enim operis maximi inter homines atque optimi illum esse perfectorem volo. (Letters to Atticus 8.11.1 As a safe voyage is the aim of the pilot, health of the physician, victory of the general, so the ideal statesman will aim at happiness for the citizens of the state to give them material security, copious wealth, wide-reaching distinction and untarnished honour. This, the greatest and finest of human achievements, I want him to perform. (trans. E. O. Winstedt))

The Second. That the bands of footmen are at this present rather an offence than a defence to the province of Munster. SP 63/135 f.149r, 1588

            Tusculanae Disputationes

Cic. Tusc. 1.2: honos alit artes, omnesque incenduntur ad studia gloria (honor nourishes arts, and glory is the spur with all to studies (trans. Young))

Sir Rob. Wingfield to [Henry VIII], Cotton Vitellius B/XIX f.349v, 28 Nov 1516  

Christopher Rous, Commonplace book 1623-4, Folger L.b.674, fol. 2v 

Horace

           Epistles

Hor. Ep. 1.27: cælumnon animum, mutant, qui trans mare currunt (they change their clime, not their mind, who rush across the sea (trans. H.R. Fairclough))

William Norris, 1602-3, commonplace book, Sloane MS 1606, fol. 1v

Memorandum concerning the affairs of Munster, [1598], SP 63/202/4, fol. 122v

            Odes

Hor. Od. 3.3.8: Impavidum ferient ruinae  (ruins would smite him undismayed (trans. C.E. Bennett))

John Colville to Sir Robert Cecil SP 52/65 f.75, Sept. 9 1599  

Hor. Od. 3.4.45-6: qui terram inertem, qui mare temperat/uentosum et urbes regnaque tristia (Who rules dull earth and stormy seas,/And towns of men, and realms of pain (trans. Conington))

Christopher Rous, Commonplace book 1623-4, Folger L.b.674, fol. 2v

Martial

Harborne to Walsingham. SP 97/1 f.66v, June 28 1584  

Mart. 2.59.3-4: Frange toros, pete vina, rosas cape, tinguere nardo: Ipse iubet mortis te meminisse deus. (Crush the couches, call for wine, wear roses, anoint thee with nard ; the god himself bids thee to remember death. (trans. Walter C.A. Ker))

Ovid
            Ars Amatoria

Ov. Ars. 3.546: Et studio mores convenienter eunt (And our behaviour is akin to our pursuit (trans. J.H. Mozley))

Throckmorton to Cecil. SP 70/26 f.78v,  May 16 1561

           Fasti

Ov. Fast. 1.485-6: quia conscia mens ut cuique est ita concipit intra/pectora pro facto spemque metumque suo (As each man’s conscience is, so doth it, for his deeds, conceive within his breast or hope or fear (trans. Sir James George Frazer), quoted by Montaigne Essais 2.5, ed. Rat p. 348)

John Colville to Sir Robert Cecil SP 52/65 f.75, Sept. 9 1599

           Metamorphoses

Ov. Met. 1. 84-6: Pronaque cum spectent animalia cetera terram,/ homini sublime dedit, caelumque videre/iussit et erectos ad sidera tollere vultus. (though all other animals are prone, and fix their gaze upon the earth, he gave to man an uplifted face and bade him stand erect and turn his eyes to heaven.(trans. Miller))

Dorothy Phillips, A sermon book [manuscript], 1616-1617, Folger V.a.347, fol. 4r

Ov. Met. 11.793: fecit amor maciem: longa internodia crurum (His passion made him lean; his legs between the joints are long (trans. Miller))

Daniel Foote, Commonplace book c. 1650, Sloane MS 595, fol. 3r

Ov. Met. 13.70:  Aspiciunt oculis superi mortalia justis (the gods regard the affairs of men with righteous eyes (trans. Miller)) 

Christopher Rous, Commonplace book 1623-4, Folger L.b.674, fol. 2v

           Tristia

Ov. Tr. 1.4: Tingitur oceano custos Erymanthidos ursae (The guardian of the Erymanthian bear dips in the ocean (trans. A. L. Wheeler)) 

Edward Dering (1598-1644), Folger X.d.530, commonplace book

Sextus Propertius            

           Elegies

Prop. 3.1.14: Non datur ad musas currere lata via (Narrow is the path that leadeth to the Muses (H. E. Butler))

Throckmorton to Cecil. SP 70/26 f.78v,  May 16 1561

Proverbs

Mel in ore, verba lactis, fel in corde, fraus in factis

Christopher Rous, Commonplace book 1623-4, Folger L.b.674, fol. 3r

Publius Syrus 

Publius Syrus Sententiae 22 amare et sapere (vix deo conceditur) (to love and to be wise (is scarcely granted even to a god))

A device by the Earl of Essex for the Queen’s entertainment. SP 12/254 f.140r,  [Nov. 17.] 1595  

Seneca

          Ad Lucilium Epistulae Morales

Sen. Ep. 4.3: Nullum malum est magnum, quod extremum est (No evil is great which is the last evil of all (trans. Richar M Gummere))

Dorothy Phillips, A sermon book [manuscript], 1616-1617, Folger V.a.347, fol. 112r

           Fragments

Sen. Frag. 39 Sapiens servabit tamquam legibus iussa, non tamquam diis grata

Christopher Rous, Commonplace book 1623-4, Folger L.b.674, fol. 3r

          Naturales Quaestiones

Sen. Nat. 4A. 18: Si vera sunt, coram magno teste laudatus es; si falsa, sine teste derisus es (If they are true, you are praised in front of a great witness, yourself. If they are false, no one is a witness to your being made a fool of (trans. Thomas H. Corcoran))

Christopher Rous, Commonplace book 1623-4, Folger L.b.674, fol. 3r

Terence

          Andria

Ter. An. 1.1.41: Obsequium amicos, veritas odium parit.   

Christopher Rous, Commonplace book 1623-4, Folger L.b.674, fol. 3r

          Eunuchus

Ter. Eu. 4.5.3: neque pes neque mens satis suom officium facit (neither feet nor senses were quite equal to their duty (trans. Henry Thomas Riley))

Sir Arthur Gorges To Sir Robert Cecil, Cecil Papers [297],  April 14 1600.

Vives

De tradendi disciplinis (Opera I, 1555, 505): Historia si adsit ex pueris facit senes : sin absit , ex senibus pueros. 

Christopher Rous, Commonplace book 1623-4, Folger L.b.674, fol. 3r

Virgil

           Eneid

Verg. A. 1.198-9: O socii — neque enim ignari sumus ante malorum —/O passi grauiora, dabit deus his quoque finem. (Companions mine, we have not failed to feel calamity till now. O, ye have borne far heavier sorrow (trans. Theodore C. Williams))

Rogers to Wilson SP 81/2 f.52v, June 28 1581  

Verg. A. 4.47-9: Quam tu urbem, soror, hanc cernes, quae surgere regna/
coniugio tali! Teucrum comitantibus armis/Punica se quantis attollet gloria rebus! (O sister, what a throne,/and what imperial city shall be thine,/if thus espoused! With Trojan arms allied/how far may not our Punic fame extend/in deeds of power?(trans. J. B. Greenough))

Anthony Gosson to Davison SP 83/12 f.57, Aug. 22 1579

Verg. A. 7.312: Flectere si nequeo Superos, Acheronta movebo (If Heaven I may not move, on Hell I call. (trans. Theodore C. Williams))

Thomas Tebolde to the Earl of Wiltshire SP 1/89 f.18v, 10 Jan 1535  

The King of Scotland to the Queen, Cecil Papers [1172], April 13 1594 

Sir Robert Cecil to Robert Bowes SP 52/53 f.53v, May 17 1594

Robert Bowes to Burghley SP 52/53 f.65, June 9 1594

Thomas Wenman to the Earl of Essex, Cecil Papers [786], Aug. 18 1599 

Richard Bower to Williamson, SP 29/367 f.211, Cecil Papers [2922], Jan. 27 1675